Blog from the Good Orbit network and beyond

News about Good Orbit shows, plus other projects and events of friends and family!

Kevin McCaffrey Comedy Album Release

Kevin McCaffrey Comedy Album Release

Kevin McCaffrey’s first stand up album came out Friday, 6/1
It is available for pre-order now, at this link: https://800PGR.lnk.to/KevinMcCaffreyEM
It’s called “Nice & Drunk,” because I tend to be both of those things. It’s released via 800 Pound Gorilla Records, and if you order it now, it will download 6/1. Best-case scenario, it charts high enough for Drake or Pusha T to rap something mean about me.
We’re having a release show & party at Union Hall in Brooklyn on Thursday 6/7 with some of my favorite comics, and if you’d like to come by then, I’d love to get nice & drunk with y’all.   
-KEVIN
Yedoye Travis debut comedy album

Yedoye Travis debut comedy album

Yedoye Travis is a stand up comedian, writer, and actor from Atlanta, GA, and host of Good Orbit podcast Rent Party (tapes monthly at Union Hall.) In 2017 he was named a New Face at the Montreal Just For Laughs festival, during which he opened for W. Kamau Bell and taped for Kevin Hart’s LOL Network. He has since appeared on Search Party, Comedy Central, Late Show with Stephen Colbert, and contributed content for MTV. He has also performed at the Hell Yes and Bridgetown Comedy festivals and appeared on the fourth season of Coming to the Stage. His debut album, OK, produced by Comedy Dynamics, was released on January 12th.
NYT: Science Is Dry, Obscure, Complex? Well, It Makes for Great Comedy

NYT: Science Is Dry, Obscure, Complex? Well, It Makes for Great Comedy

NYT article featured The Scientists!

“Not that these types of shows always stick to breezy topics. “The Scientists,” the podcast and live show hosted by the comedians Blythe Roberson and Madelyn Freed, recently did a show on cancer and the search for cures. Although the program included a live sketch featuring a hydrorobot that punched the disease out of people, they admitted the topic was tougher than past themes like artificial intelligence or insects.

The women view their show, which is heavy on slides, as a forum for merging two disparate cultures: scientists, who, according to Ms. Freed, pursue their research because of “some other mystical force that isn’t social pressure or, like, trying to be interesting”; and comedians, who are mostly motivated by a need for validation through applause and laughter.”